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Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains

Across the Corn Belt, showers are confined to the upper Great Lakes region. Elsewhere, very warm, dry weather is ideal for developmentally delayed corn and soybeans. On September 17, corn was at least 15 percentage points behind the 5-year state average maturation pace in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas. On the Plains, late-season heat across most of the region continues to promote summer crop maturation and fieldwork, including harvest activities and winter wheat planting. Continue reading Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 23, 2017

A big change in weather on the Plains

Recovery from Hurricanes Irma and Maria continues across Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, although locally heavy showers, pockets of flash flooding, and widespread power outages are disrupting clean-up efforts. Meanwhile, a cold front continues to advance eastward across the Rockies and High Plains, forming a stark boundary between warm weather in the eastern half of the U.S. and chilly conditions in the West. During the weekend, precipitation will subside across the Intermountain West and develop along an axis stretching from the southern High Plains into the upper Midwest. Continue reading A big change in weather on the Plains at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Soybean harvest underway for Minnesota farmer

The 2017 soybean harvest is underway for a farmer south of the Twin Cities. Brent Mohn of Lakeville says the field being combined Friday was planted the 15th of May. “The soybeans we’re in today definitely got hit by some white mold. They’re still yielding fair. We’re kind of floating in the 50 range. You get into some of the pockets where there wasn’t white mold (and) they’re pushing the mid-70’s.” He tells Brownfield soybean moisture climbed from 12 to 14 percent because of late-week heat and humidity. Continue reading Soybean harvest underway for Minnesota farmer at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Cattle futures close higher on short covering

At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, cattle futures closed higher on short covering. Some support also came from the anticipation of Friday’s placement number, however that did not happen. Wholesale beef prices have stabilized some this week and are also providing some support to cattle futures. October live cattle closed $1.47 higher at $111.57 December live cattle closed $1.22 higher at $117.42. September feeder cattle are $.22 higher at $153.40 and October feeder cattle closed $.22 higher at $156.10. Continue reading Cattle futures close higher on short covering at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Solid demand supports soybeans, corn

Soybeans were higher on commercial and technical buying, posting a positive week to week finish. Mexico bought 190,000 tons of 2017/18 U.S. beans, continuing the recent hot streak of sales. Mexico is the second biggest buyer of U.S. beans, after China, but has only purchased about one tenth of Beijing’s marketing year to date total. The trade is watching near term weather in the Midwest and Plains, which mostly looks non-threatening. Soybean meal was higher and bean oil was lower on the adjustment of product spreads. Continue reading Solid demand supports soybeans, corn at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

DuPont Pioneer backs away from control claims

DuPont Pioneer says its Cry1F trait, Herculex I Bt, no longer protects corn against the western bean cutworm. Cry1F was a corn borer toxin to begin with, not a western bean cutworm toxin, according to Chris DiFonzo, an extension entomologist at Michigan State University. “The control was never excellent,” DiFonzo told Brownfield Ag News Friday, “and the wide-spread planting allowed for the rapid development of resistance.” DuPont Pioneer Scientific Affairs Director Clint Pilcher acknowledges a decrease in susceptibility among western bean cutworm populations. Continue reading DuPont Pioneer backs away from control claims at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Red meat stocks down, still ample

The USDA says red meat supplies in cold storage at the end of August were 1% below year ago levels at 1.1 billion pounds. However, both pork and beef stocks were larger than what some analysts had been expecting and above their respective five year averages following heavier than normal in-movement as high levels of red meat production cancel out any improvement in demand. Pork stocks totaled 575.681 million pounds, up 4% on the month, down 5% on the year, with beef stocks at 476.260 million pounds, 10% higher than the previous month, slightly lower than last year. Continue reading Red meat stocks down, still ample at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Cattle placements top most projections

The USDA says more cattle than expected were placed on feed in August. Placements were up 3% on the year at 1.928 million head, the average estimate was for a 2.5% decline, with pasture conditions worsening because of dry conditions in many key U.S. feeding areas. That’s even more impressive when taking into account the 15% jump from August 2015 to August 2016 as the industry re-expanded following widespread drought. Cattle placed on feed in August will head to market between February and June 2018. Continue reading Cattle placements top most projections at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Cost of drying grain probably going up

The cost of drying grain is likely going up as harvest progresses. CHS Hedging energy analyst Tony Headrick says propane exports remain strong. “That export channel is expected to continue to remain open for two reasons. One is that the Dollar is weaker, and number two is that international propane prices are higher.” Headrick tells Brownfield if a large amount of the U.S crop needs to be dried down, he’s concerned a propane shortage will lead to escalating prices through at least winter. Continue reading Cost of drying grain probably going up at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Milk futures, cash cheese higher

Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were supported by follow through buying. September was $.02 higher at $16.37, October was up $.15 at $16.17, November was $.30 higher at $16.25, and December was up $.26 at $16.09. Cash cheese blocks were $.02 higher at $1.6125. Five loads were sold, including two at $1.6125. The last uncovered offer was for two loads at $1.62. Barrels were up seven at $1.60. Continue reading Milk futures, cash cheese higher at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 22, 2017

Dec. corn closed at $3.53 and 1/2, up 3 and 1/4 cents Nov. soybeans closed at $9.84 and 1/4, up 13 and 1/2 cents Oct. soybean meal closed at $315.00, up $6.00 Oct. soybean oil closed at 33.99, down 11 points Dec. wheat closed at $4.49 and 1/2, down 3 cents Oct. live cattle closed at $111.57, up $1.47 Oct. lean hogs closed at $55.70, down $1.62 Nov. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 22, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Soybean futures back above 200-day moving averages

An analyst says soybean futures had a surprisingly strong finish to the week. The November contract closed 13 ½ cents higher at $9.84 1/4 Friday, and January settled within six cents of the $10-dollar level. Tony Headrick with CHS Hedging tells Brownfield some key contracts are back above their 200-day moving averages. “To a degree, (I’m) surprised. There was some indication of corn and soybean fund activity that were buyers coming in today. Continue reading Soybean futures back above 200-day moving averages at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Extension there for farmers facing pain and stress

Michigan State University Extension continues to help farmers deal with financial stress and is responding to the opioid epidemic. MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Dean Ron Hendrick says extension staff are available to assist those struggling with the economic downturn in farming. “Drops in commodity prices that have made it hard for people to plan sustainably for their financial future. So in addition to helping them with management of the on-farm resources, we want to be a resource for people who find themselves under levels of stress that might be unprecedented, or things they just haven’t had to deal with before.” He says extension is also on the frontlines of opioid addiction that has spread from urban centers to rural areas. Continue reading Extension there for farmers facing pain and stress at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Morrison Swine Innovator Prize unveiled

The University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine has unveiled a prize to honor the late Dr. Bob Morrison by encouraging the next generation of swine veterinary leaders. The Morrison Swine Innovator Prize will consist of a monetary prize funded by sponsoring producers, as well as networking opportunities for finalists and sponsor representatives. Dr. Perle Boyer, assistant professor in the Department of Vet Med, says an important way of honoring Dr. Continue reading Morrison Swine Innovator Prize unveiled at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Seatbelts in tractors/combines for good reason

A farm safety specialist says farmers might not realize how much seatbelts matter to their safety, “I’m making a pitch that they start using those seatbelts that come with their tractors.” Rob Mastick with American Family Insurance says “the reason is, you might break an axle in the field and if you don’t have it on, you might get bounced pretty badly” but out on the road if the farmer hits a soft shoulder at 25 to 30 miles an hour, or someone runs into THEM, that can result in significant injuries, “I’ve been doing this for about 30 years and I ask every farmer the question, ‘Do you use the seatbelts that are on there?’; and I have never one time got an answer ‘yes.’” And, he tells Brownfield, wearing seatbelts in tractors and combines reduces potential injuries out in the field during harvest or any time. Continue reading Seatbelts in tractors/combines for good reason at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures

A southeast Minnesota farmer is incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures. Kaleb Anderson has a diversified crop and livestock farm in Goodhue County, utilizing various grazing strategies for his cattle. He’s in year two of mob-grazing pasture mid-summer to create a seed bed for drilling warm season annuals. “If you look at a cool season growth curve, the growth in the spring is really high. Continue reading Incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Midday cash livestock markets

Light to moderate cash cattle trade is developing with live prices about $2.00 higher than last week. While bids are firming up in parts of the North, business has not yet developed given the higher asking prices of $172 to $174. Look for more trade to develop before mid-afternoon as short-bought packers move to cover immediate needs. Bids are reported at $108.00 live and $166.00 to $170.00 dressed. Boxed beef cutout is firm at the midday with light to moderate box movement. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff

The Arkansas State Plant Board has voted unanimously to recommend a ban on spraying dicamba herbicide on cropland between April 16th and October 31st. The proposed ban would prevent in-season use of dicamba on soybeans and cotton. Proponents of the ban say it is necessary to avoid a repeat of dicamba drift-related crop damage reported by hundreds of Arkansas farmers in 2017. Opponents of the ban say it essentially defeats the purpose of the new dicamba herbicides, which were designed to be sprayed over the top of crops throughout the growing season. Continue reading Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Texas farmer finds a niche with organic cotton

More and more farmers are looking to niche markets to diversify their farming operations. Jeremy Brown, who farms in west Texas near the small town of South Plains, added organic cotton to his farming operation back in 2010. He says it was strictly a business decision. “It was an opportunity for me to get a little bit more price for my product,” Brown tells Brownfield. “As a business owner, it’s no different than Nike and those other companies and what they’re trying to do.” We spoke with Brown at a recent USFRA Food Dialogues event in Lincoln, Nebraska. Continue reading Texas farmer finds a niche with organic cotton at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

Invasive worm worries Wisconsin researchers, DNR

Wisconsin researchers and conservation officials are concerned about an invasive earthworm species. University of Wisconsin Ecologist Carly Ziter says crazy worms, also called Alabama Jumpers, break down plant material and nutrients faster than regular worms or other soil organisms releasing too many nutrients at once. “One of the worries about this is that when you release so many nutrients so quickly, they could be lost. So, we know that these earthworms can raise for example the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in our soils, and it might leave them vulnerable to leaching or to getting into our water system.” Ziter says the worms work so fast, it’s like having a fast-acting fertilizer on soil, but they also change the soil texture. Continue reading Invasive worm worries Wisconsin researchers, DNR at Brownfield Ag News.
Read Article | Sep 22, 2017

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